Posts Tagged ‘data.lincoln.ac.uk’

Hack da Fens: open bib hack day objectives!

Posted on May 17th, 2012 by Paul Stainthorp

Most of the CLOCK project team (ABECCLTJPS) are at CARET in Cambridge today and tomorrow (17-18 May 2012) to generally hack bibliographic data and try and point the way for the remaining 2 months’ technical development for the CLOCK project.

After coffee on day 1 we agreed our objectives for the next two days. They are:

  1. To review what we’ve done so far and what we need to do. To play with the SPARQL and JSON-parsing search tools that Andrew Beeken has started to develop and to incorporate more data (BL, etc.)
  2. To think about the user interface for CLOCK: how do we present open bib data from multiple sources (Lincoln, Cambridge, Harvard, BL, OpenLibrary, other) in a single UI in a way which helps our users (cataloguers. researchers) solve problems?
  3. What’s the high level architecture for CLOCK? How does data flow thru’ the system – can we draw a meaningful diagram?
  4. A comparison of open data / Discovery projects that Ed Chamberlain is involved in! What can we take and re-use from OpenBiblio2 and the OEM-UK project? What might those projects be able to take and re-use from CLOCK?
  5. What are we going to do with all this data? A plan forhttp://data.lincoln.ac.uk/http://data.lib.cam.ac.uk/, and http://data.ac.uk/library (or http://library.data.ac.uk/).
  6. To run interviews and live cognitive workthroughs with cataloguers in Cambridge and Lincoln.

Tick tock we don’t stop. Introducing CLOCK, a new JISC-funded resource discovery project at the universities of Lincoln and Cambridge

Posted on December 11th, 2011 by Paul Stainthorp

Cambridge CLOCKThe title says it all, really. The University of Lincoln, working in consortium with Cambridge University Library and Owen Stephens Consulting, has been awarded £49,877 by JISC to investigate ways of driving innovation in libraries’ interactions with Open Bibliographic Data, through a project we’re calling CLOCK (Cambridge-Lincoln Open Catalogue Knowledgebase).

CLOCK is a continuation of and elaboration upon the work of two recent JISC Discovery projects—Jerome at the University of Lincoln and COMET at the University of Cambridge—via a programme of development work shared between the two institutions, and with library consultant Owen Stephens. JISC were impressed enough with the work of both projects, and sufficiently interested in the potential for collaboration, that they encouraged our joint bid for follow-up funding.

Between now and the end of July, 2012, the CLOCK project will provide us with a framework to:

…[1] exploit through real-world applications the significant amount of data released openly by Cambridge University Library; [2] apply the Jerome database architecture, iterative development methodology, and API framework to a bibliographic dataset an order of magnitude greater than the University of Lincoln’s; and [3] to build and enable a new set of tools and demonstrator services which will enable the future development of public Open Bib Data web applications of practical utility to libraries and end-users.

You can read the full bid document, here.

I’m very much looking forward to working with Ed Chamberlain, Systems Librarian in the University Library at the University of Cambridge, along with Owen Stephens, veteran of a number of campaigns to open up access to library data, and Chris Leach (Systems Librarian) and Ian Snowley (University Librarian) from the University of Lincoln. Thanks are due to all of them for their help in writing the successful bid; to the Research & Enterprise Development office at Lincoln for their invaluable assistance in putting together the project budget; and to the LNCD group at the University of Lincoln for providing the kind of supportive development platform that makes these kind of projects possible.

Finally, a big thank you to Andy McGregor and the JISC Digital Infrastructure: Information and library infrastructure: Resource discovery programme, for this opportunity to further explore the blossoming environment of open bibliographic data/open discovery in libraries. If you haven’t done so already, you might like to take a look at the following websites:

As with all our projects, we’ll be blogging it comprehensively (so stand by for a steady stream of awful clock-related puns used as blog post titles). Although there’s little to see there yet, the CLOCK project blog is at: http://clock.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/ – along with its own RSS feed RSS feed icon. Watch that space!